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Understanding Dual Diagnosis

By January 15, 2023No Comments
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What is Dual Diagnosis?

Dual diagnosis refers to the co-occurrence of a mental health disorder and a substance abuse disorder. It is also sometimes referred to as co-occurring disorders or comorbidity.

People with dual diagnosis may experience symptoms of both their mental health disorder and their substance abuse disorder at the same time. For example, someone with depression and an alcohol use disorder may experience both feelings of sadness and an inability to stop drinking alcohol.

Treatment for dual diagnosis typically involves addressing both the mental health disorder and the substance abuse disorder simultaneously. This may involve a combination of therapy, medication, and support groups. It is important for individuals with dual diagnosis to receive treatment from a team of mental health professionals who are experienced in addressing co-occurring disorders.

The Link Between Substance Abuse and Mental Health

There is a complex relationship between substance abuse and mental health. Substance abuse can lead to the development of mental health disorders, and mental health disorders can increase the risk of developing substance abuse disorders.

For example, using drugs or alcohol can lead to changes in brain chemistry that can trigger or exacerbate mental health symptoms, such as depression or anxiety. Similarly, mental health disorders can lead to substance abuse as a way of coping with negative feelings or self-medicating.

It is also important to note that some substances of abuse, such as stimulants, can trigger or worsen certain mental health disorders, such as psychosis.

Treatment for co-occurring substance abuse and mental health disorders, also known as dual diagnosis, typically involves addressing both disorders simultaneously. This can be challenging, as the symptoms of the two disorders can interact and exacerbate each other. However, with appropriate treatment and support, individuals with dual diagnosis can learn to manage their symptoms and improve their overall quality of life.

Common Co-Occurring Disorders

There are many different mental health disorders that can co-occur with substance abuse disorders, including:

  1. Depression: Depression is a mood disorder characterized by persistent feelings of sadness, hopelessness, and a lack of interest or pleasure in activities.
  2. Anxiety disorders: Anxiety disorders include a range of conditions that involve excessive worry or fear, such as generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and phobias.
  3. Bipolar disorder: Bipolar disorder is a mood disorder characterized by extreme shifts in mood, energy, and behavior.
  4. Schizophrenia: Schizophrenia is a severe mental health disorder characterized by hallucinations, delusions, and disorganized thinking.
  5. Personality disorders: Personality disorders are characterized by persistent patterns of thoughts, emotions, and behaviors that differ significantly from the expectations of an individual’s culture. Examples include borderline personality disorder, narcissistic personality disorder, and antisocial personality disorder.

These are just a few examples of the many mental health disorders that can co-occur with substance abuse disorders.

Who is at Risk for Co-Occurring Disorders?

There is no one single factor that can predict who is at risk for co-occurring disorders, also known as dual diagnosis. However, research has identified a number of risk factors that may increase the likelihood of developing co-occurring disorders. Some of these risk factors include:

  1. A family history of mental illness or substance abuse: A family history of mental illness or substance abuse may increase the risk of developing co-occurring disorders.
  2. Trauma or abuse: Exposure to trauma or abuse, especially in childhood, can increase the risk of developing co-occurring disorders.
  3. Chronic stress or anxiety: Chronic stress or anxiety can increase the risk of developing mental health disorders and substance abuse disorders.
  4. Lack of social support: Individuals who lack supportive relationships with family and friends may be at increased risk for co-occurring disorders.
  5. Previous treatment for mental health or substance abuse: Previous treatment for mental health or substance abuse disorders can increase the risk of developing co-occurring disorders.

What is Dual Diagnosis Treatment Like?

If you or someone you know is experiencing these or other warning signs, it is important to seek help from a mental health professional. Treatment for co-occurring disorders typically involves addressing both the mental health disorder and the substance abuse disorder simultaneously, and can be very effective in helping individuals manage their symptoms and improve their overall quality of life.

Treatment for dual diagnosis typically involves a combination of therapies and support services that address both the mental health disorder and the substance abuse disorder simultaneously. This can be challenging, as the symptoms of the two disorders can interact and exacerbate each other.

Some common elements of treatment for dual diagnosis may include:

  1. Medication: Certain medications may be used to manage the symptoms of the mental health disorder and/or the substance abuse disorder.
  2. Therapy: Different types of therapy can be helpful in treating dual diagnosis, including cognitive-behavioral therapy, dialectical behavior therapy, and acceptance and commitment therapy.
  3. Support groups: Support groups can provide a sense of community and help individuals with dual diagnosis connect with others who are facing similar challenges.
  4. Rehabilitation and recovery programs: Rehabilitation and recovery programs can provide structure and support during the recovery process, and may include activities such as group therapy, individual counseling, and skill-building workshops.
  5. Holistic approaches: Some individuals with dual diagnosis may find it helpful to incorporate holistic practices such as meditation, yoga, or acupuncture into their treatment plan.

It is important for individuals with dual diagnosis to work closely with a treatment team that is experienced in addressing co-occurring disorders. This team may include a psychiatrist, therapist, and other mental health professionals, as well as substance abuse counselors and other support staff. To learn more about our holistic, dual diagnosis programming, contact us.

 

Author Flatirons Recovery

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