ADDICTIONS TREATED

Structured Treatment At A Number Of Levels Of Care

Alcohol Addiction

The most frequently misused substance in the United States is alcohol. Currently referred to in the professional literature as Alcohol Use Disorder, though more frequently referred to by the term Alcoholism, according to the National Institute on Alcohol and Alcoholism (NIAAA) its misuse impacts as 14.4 million adults ages 18 and older, including 9.2 million men (7.6 percent of men in this age group) and 5.3 million women (4.1 percent of women in this age group).

Due primarily to the fact that alcohol is legal, though also influenced by the cultural saturation of alcohol consumption, many believe that the impact of alcohol use relative to other drugs is benign. However, the NIAAA reports that “an estimated 88,0005 people (approximately 62,000 men and 26,000 women) die from alcohol-related causes annually, making alcohol the third leading preventable cause of death in the United States.” Further, a landmark study in 2019 from researchers in Australia concluded that—after accounting for a number of factors, including damage they caused to users (including illness, injury and death), and the effects drugs have on users’ families and the wider community, such as through violence, crime, unemployment, economic costs and relationship breakdowns—alcohol misuse caused the most pervasive community-wide damage, ahead of methamphetamine, heroin, fentanyl, and cocaine.

How to tell if you or a loved one is using alcohol problematically?

The following criteria come from the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) released by the American Psychiatric Association in 2013:

  • Alcohol is taken in larger amounts or over a longer period of time than was intended.
  • A persistent desire or unsuccessful efforts to cut down or control alcohol use.
  • A great deal of time is spent in activities, necessary to obtain alcohol, use alcohol, or recover from its effects.
  • Craving or a strong desire or urge to use alcohol.
  • Recurrent alcohol use resulting in a failure to fulfill major role obligations at work, school or home.
  • Continued alcohol use despite having persistent or recurrent social or interpersonal problems caused or exacerbated by the effects of alcohol.
  • Recurrent alcohol use in situations in which it is physically hazardous.
  • Alcohol use is continued despite knowledge of having persistent or recurrent physical or psychological problems that likely to have been caused or exacerbated by alcohol.
  • Physical or psychological issues that are likely to have been caused or exacerbated by alcohol use.
  • High tolerance for alcohol use.
  • Withdrawal symptoms experienced without using alcohol.
  • Alcohol Treatment at Flatirons Recovery

    Those wishing to engage in treatment for alcoholism, or Alcohol Use Disorder, at Flatirons Recovery will typically engage in a medical detoxification program for a clinically determined period of 2-7 days to ensure that a client is medically stable.

    Post-detox, treatment for Alcohol Use Disorder at Flatirons Recovery typically begins in our PHP/Day Treatment program for a period of at least 4 weeks, the details of which can be found here.

    From there, clients often step-down into our IOP for a period of 4-12 weeks, while continuing to work with their therapeutic team on a plan to address support needs that will be crucial to maintaining recovery after structured treatment ends.

Treatment for Addiction

If you or a loved one’s alcohol use meet at least two of these criteria in the past 12 months, then you may be suffering from a substance use disorder requiring treatment.

Heroin Addiction

Over the past 15 years, heroin and opiate use has become an epidemic of significant proportions in the United States, impacting communities from nearly every socioeconomic category in tragic ways. Many researchers have estimated that the number of people currently using heroin for the first time is nearly double the number of people in 2006, due in large part to the over prescription of opioids.

2018 data from the National Institute on Drug Abuse show that “every day, 128 people in the United States die after overdosing on opioids. The misuse of and addiction to opioids—including prescription pain relieversheroin, and synthetic opioids such as fentanyl-is a serious national crisis that affects public health as well as social and economic welfare.”

Chronic intravenous heroin users, in addition to being at elevated risk for death due to overdose, are also more vulnerable to contracting diseases such as HIV and Hepatitis C.

How to tell if you or a loved one is using heroin problematically?

The following criteria come from the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) released by the American Psychiatric Association in 2013:

  • Heroin is taken in larger amounts or over a longer period of time than was intended.
  • A persistent desire or unsuccessful efforts to cut down or control heroin use.
  • A great deal of time is spent in activities, necessary to obtain alcohol, use heroin, or recover from its effects.
  • Craving or a strong desire or urge to use heroin.
  • Recurrent heroin use resulting in a failure to fulfill major role obligations at work, school or home.
  • Continued heroin use despite having persistent or recurrent social or interpersonal problems caused or exacerbated by the effects of alcohol.
  • Recurrent heroin use in situations in which it is physically hazardous.
  • Heroin use is continued despite knowledge of having persistent or recurrent physical or psychological problems likely to have been caused or exacerbated by heroin.
  • Physical or psychological issues that are likely to have been caused or exacerbated by heroin use.
  • High tolerance for heroin use.
  • Withdrawal symptoms experienced without using heroin.
  • Heroin Treatment at Flatirons Recovery

    Those wishing to engage in treatment for Heroin Use Disorder at Flatirons Recovery will typically engage in a medical detoxification program for a clinically determined period of 2-7 days to ensure that a client is medically stable.

    Post-detox, treatment for Heroin Use Disorder at Flatirons Recovery typically begins in our PHP/Day Treatment program for a period of at least 4 weeks, the details of which can be found here.

    From there, clients often step-down into our IOP for a period of 4-12 weeks, while continuing to work with their therapeutic team on a plan to address support needs that will be crucial to maintaining recovery after structured treatment ends.

Treatment for Addiction

If you or a loved one’s alcohol use meet at least two of these criteria in the past 12 months, then you may be suffering from a substance use disorder requiring treatment.

Cocaine Addiction

The 2018 National Survey on Drug Use and Health reports that in the past year approximately 5.5 million people in the United States used cocaine, including approximately 750,000 users of crack cocaine. This same study found that “3.5 million adults aged 26 or older used cocaine in the past year, including 666,000 who used crack.” The percentage of adults in this age group in 2018 who used cocaine in the past year was higher than the percentages in most years from 2011 to 2015, but it was similar to the percentages in 2016 and 2017. The estimate of past year crack use in 2018 among adults aged 26 or older was lower than estimates in 2002 to 2008, but it was similar to the estimates in 2009 to 2017.”

This same study found that about 977,000 people aged 12 or older in 2018 met clinical criteria for a diagnosis of Cocaine Use Disorder in the past year, equating to approximately 0.4 percent of the population of the United States. The study also determined that this percentage of people was relatively consistent with percentages found in studies from 2009 to 2017, but lower than the percentages from 2002 to 2008.

How to tell if you or a loved one is using cocaine problematically?

The following criteria come from the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) released by the American Psychiatric Association in 2013:

  • Cocaine is taken in larger amounts or over a longer period of time than was intended.
  • A persistent desire or unsuccessful efforts to cut down or control cocaine use.
  • A great deal of time is spent in activities, necessary to obtain alcohol, use cocaine, or recover from its effects.
  • Craving or a strong desire or urge to use cocaine.
  • Recurrent cocaine use resulting in a failure to fulfill major role obligations at work, school or home.
  • Continued cocaine use despite having persistent or recurrent social or interpersonal problems caused or exacerbated by the effects of alcohol.
  • Recurrent cocaine use in situations in which it is physically hazardous.
  • Cocaine use is continued despite knowledge of having persistent or recurrent physical or psychological problems likely to have been caused or exacerbated by cocaine.
  • Physical or psychological issues that are likely to have been caused or exacerbated by cocaine use.
  • High tolerance for cocaine use.
  • Withdrawal symptoms experienced without using cocaine.

Cocaine Treatment at Flatirons Recovery

Those wishing to engage in treatment for Cocaine Use Disorder at Flatirons Recovery will typically engage in a medical detoxification program for a clinically determined period of 2-7 days to ensure that a client is medically stable.

Post-detox, treatment for Cocaine Use Disorder at Flatirons Recovery typically begins in our PHP/Day Treatment program for a period of at least 4 weeks, the details of which can be found here.

From there, clients often step-down into our IOP for a period of 4-12 weeks, while continuing to work with their therapeutic team on a plan to address support needs that will be crucial to maintaining recovery after structured treatment ends.

Treatment for Addiction

If you or a loved one’s alcohol use meet at least two of these criteria in the past 12 months, then you may be suffering from a substance use disorder requiring treatment.

Marijuana Addiction

Colorado residents voted to legalize recreational marijuana in 2012. Since then, various organizations estimate that the number of teens in the State of Colorado using marijuana has stayed relatively consistent. However, a study by the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System determined that adult marijuana use in the state of Colorado increased from 13.6 percent in 2016 to 15.5 percent in 2017, driven by what they believe to be “a significant rise in marijuana use among 18 to 34-year-olds.”

Nationally, according to the 2018 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, approximately 2 million young adults aged 18 to 25 in 2018 met diagnostic criteria for a Marijuana Use Disorder in the past year, equating to roughly 5.9 percent of young adults. The same study found that roughly 1.9 million adults aged 26 or older met criteria for Marijuana Use Disorder in the past year, or approximately 1 percent of adults in this age group.

Along with the rise in the legalization of recreational marijuana in Colorado and other states, has come the rise in the potency of new strains of cannabis. Dr. Elizabeth Studt, MD writes in the Journal of the Missouri State Medical Association that “The primary problem with the current available cannabis in dispensaries in Colorado is that the THC content is not like it used to be.” She writes that prior to the 1990s the THC content in marijuana was less than 2%, which steadily grew throughout the 1990s. Dr. Studt’s research found that between “1995 and 2015 there has been a 212% increase in THC content in the marijuana flower. In 2017 the most popular strains found in dispensaries in Colorado had a range of THC content from 17–28%.”

Such high potency marijuana, along with the various ways in which it is now available in edible form, makes the potential for problematic use of cannabis an ever growing issue for many communities of people.

How to tell if you or a loved one is using marijuana problematically?

The following criteria come from the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) released by the American Psychiatric Association in 2013:

  • Marijuana is taken in larger amounts or over a longer period of time than was intended.
  • A persistent desire or unsuccessful efforts to cut down or control marijuana use.
  • A great deal of time is spent in activities, necessary to obtain alcohol, use marijuana, or recover from its effects.
  • Craving or a strong desire or urge to use marijuana.
  • Recurrent marijuana use resulting in a failure to fulfill major role obligations at work, school or home.
  • Continued marijuana use despite having persistent or recurrent social or interpersonal problems caused or exacerbated by the effects of alcohol.
  • Recurrent marijuana use in situations in which it is physically hazardous.
  • Marijuana use is continued despite knowledge of having persistent or recurrent physical or psychological problems likely to have been caused or exacerbated by marijuana.
  • Physical or psychological issues that are likely to have been caused or exacerbated by marijuana use.
  • High tolerance for marijuana.
  • Withdrawal symptoms experienced without using marijuana.

Marijuana Treatment at Flatirons Recovery

Those wishing to engage in treatment for Marijuana Use Disorder at Flatirons Recovery may engage in a medical detoxification program for a clinically determined period of 2-7 days to ensure that a client is medically stable. However, if a potential client is using marijuana exclusively, a period of detoxification may not be necessary due to the relatively mild withdrawal symptoms that are typically associated with its use.

Treatment for Marijuana Use Disorder at Flatirons Recovery typically begins in our PHP/Day Treatment program for a period of at least 4 weeks, the details of which can be found here.

From there, clients often step-down into our IOP for a period of 4-12 weeks, while continuing to work with their therapeutic team on a plan to address support needs that will be crucial to maintaining recovery after structured treatment ends.

Treatment for Addiction

If you or a loved one’s alcohol use meet at least two of these criteria in the past 12 months, then you may be suffering from a substance use disorder requiring treatment.

Methamphetamine Addiction

Meth has entered into the public consciousness in new ways recently though popular television shows such as Breaking Bad, however in reality meth has been impacting communities across the United State for decades.

Among adults aged 26 or older in 2018, the National Survey on Drug Use and Health found that 0.7 percent were past year methamphetamine users. This percentage represents 1.6 million adults in the United States who used methamphetamine in the past year, which was higher than the percentages in 2016 and 2017, but similar to the percentage in 2015.

However, it is important to note the degree to which these numbers appear to mask regional variability. While methamphetamine use across the United States as a whole has stayed relatively steady over the past 5 years, the highest impact is in the western and midwestern regions of the US; more than 70 percent of local law enforcement agencies from the pacific and west central regions of the US report methamphetamine as the greatest drug threat in their area.

Further, the National Institute on Drug Abuse’s National Drug Early Warning System (NDEWS) found “that treatment admissions for methamphetamine as the primary substance of use were less than one percent in sites east of the Mississippi River, but ranged from 12-29 percent in the sites west of the Mississippi. Nationwide, overdose deaths from the category of drugs that includes methamphetamine increased by 7.5 times between 2007 and 2017.”

How to tell if you or a loved one is using meth problematically?

The following criteria come from the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) released by the American Psychiatric Association in 2013:

  • Methamphetamine is taken in larger amounts or over a longer period of time than was intended.
  • A persistent desire or unsuccessful efforts to cut down or control methamphetamine use.
  • A great deal of time is spent in activities, necessary to obtain methamphetamine, use, or recover from its effects.
  • Craving or a strong desire or urge to use methamphetamine.
  • Recurrent methamphetamine use resulting in a failure to fulfill major role obligations at work, school or home.
  • Continued methamphetamine use despite having persistent or recurrent social or interpersonal problems caused or exacerbated by the effects of alcohol.
  • Recurrent methamphetamine use in situations in which it is physically hazardous.
  • Methamphetamine use is continued despite knowledge of having persistent or recurrent physical or psychological problems likely to have been caused or exacerbated by methamphetamine.
  • Physical or psychological issues that are likely to have been caused or exacerbated by methamphetamine use.
  • High tolerance for methamphetamine.
  • Withdrawal symptoms experienced without using methamphetamine.

Methamphetamine Treatment at Flatirons Recovery

Those wishing to engage in treatment for Methamphetamine Use Disorder at Flatirons Recovery will typically engage in a medical detoxification program for a clinically determined period of 2-7 days to ensure that a client is medically stable.

Post-detox, treatment for Methamphetamine Use Disorder at Flatirons Recovery typically begins in our PHP/Day Treatment program for a period of at least 4 weeks, the details of which can be found here.

From there, clients often step-down into our IOP for a period of 4-12 weeks, while continuing to work with their therapeutic team on a plan to address support needs that will be crucial to maintaining recovery after structured treatment ends.

Treatment for Addiction

If you or a loved one’s alcohol use meet at least two of these criteria in the past 12 months, then you may be suffering from a substance use disorder requiring treatment.

Methamphetamine Addiction

Meth has entered into the public consciousness in new ways recently though popular television shows such as Breaking Bad, however in reality meth has been impacting communities across the United State for decades.

Among adults aged 26 or older in 2018, the National Survey on Drug Use and Health found that 0.7 percent were past year methamphetamine users. This percentage represents 1.6 million adults in the United States who used methamphetamine in the past year, which was higher than the percentages in 2016 and 2017, but similar to the percentage in 2015.

However, it is important to note the degree to which these numbers appear to mask regional variability. While methamphetamine use across the United States as a whole has stayed relatively steady over the past 5 years, the highest impact is in the western and midwestern regions of the US; more than 70 percent of local law enforcement agencies from the pacific and west central regions of the US report methamphetamine as the greatest drug threat in their area.

Further, the National Institute on Drug Abuse’s National Drug Early Warning System (NDEWS) found “that treatment admissions for methamphetamine as the primary substance of use were less than one percent in sites east of the Mississippi River, but ranged from 12-29 percent in the sites west of the Mississippi. Nationwide, overdose deaths from the category of drugs that includes methamphetamine increased by 7.5 times between 2007 and 2017.”

How to tell if you or a loved one is using meth problematically?

The following criteria come from the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) released by the American Psychiatric Association in 2013:

  • Methamphetamine is taken in larger amounts or over a longer period of time than was intended.
  • A persistent desire or unsuccessful efforts to cut down or control methamphetamine use.
  • A great deal of time is spent in activities, necessary to obtain methamphetamine, use, or recover from its effects.
  • Craving or a strong desire or urge to use methamphetamine.
  • Recurrent methamphetamine use resulting in a failure to fulfill major role obligations at work, school or home.
  • Continued methamphetamine use despite having persistent or recurrent social or interpersonal problems caused or exacerbated by the effects of alcohol.
  • Recurrent methamphetamine use in situations in which it is physically hazardous.
  • Methamphetamine use is continued despite knowledge of having persistent or recurrent physical or psychological problems likely to have been caused or exacerbated by methamphetamine.
  • Physical or psychological issues that are likely to have been caused or exacerbated by methamphetamine use.
  • High tolerance for methamphetamine.
  • Withdrawal symptoms experienced without using methamphetamine.

Methamphetamine Treatment at Flatirons Recovery

Those wishing to engage in treatment for Methamphetamine Use Disorder at Flatirons Recovery will typically engage in a medical detoxification program for a clinically determined period of 2-7 days to ensure that a client is medically stable.

Post-detox, treatment for Methamphetamine Use Disorder at Flatirons Recovery typically begins in our PHP/Day Treatment program for a period of at least 4 weeks, the details of which can be found here.

From there, clients often step-down into our IOP for a period of 4-12 weeks, while continuing to work with their therapeutic team on a plan to address support needs that will be crucial to maintaining recovery after structured treatment ends.

Treatment for Addiction

If you or a loved one’s methamphetamine use meet at least two of these criteria in the past 12 months, then you may be suffering from a substance use disorder requiring treatment.

Prescription Medication Addiction

One of the steepest barriers to people entering treatment for prescription medications is the belief that if a medical doctor has prescribed it, that it cannot be harmful. However, addiction to powerful prescription medications such as Oxycontin, Klonopin, or Adderall can be just as–if not more–problematic than typical street drugs. Among the 8.1 million people that the 2018 National Survey on Drug Use and Health estimates had an illicit drug use disorder, “the most common disorders were for marijuana (4.4 million) and misuse of prescription pain relievers (1.7 million).”

Common prescriptions medications that people enter into substance use disorders treatment for include:

  • Benzodiazepines (Klonopin, Xanax, Valium)
  • Opioids (Dilaudid, Fentanyl, Morphine, Oxycodone, Oxycontin, Percocet, and Vicodin)
  • Stimulants (Adderall, Ritalin)

How to tell if you or a loved one is using prescription medications problematically?

The following criteria come from the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) released by the American Psychiatric Association in 2013:

  • Prescription medication is taken in larger amounts or over a longer period of time than was intended.
  • A persistent desire or unsuccessful efforts to cut down or control prescription medication use.
  • A great deal of time is spent in activities, necessary to obtain prescription medication, use, or recover from its effects.
  • Craving or a strong desire or urge to use prescription medication.
  • Recurrent prescription medication use resulting in a failure to fulfill major role obligations at work, school or home.
  • Continued prescription medication use despite having persistent or recurrent social or interpersonal problems caused or exacerbated by the effects of alcohol.
  • Recurrent prescription medication use in situations in which it is physically hazardous.
  • Prescription medication is continued despite knowledge of having persistent or recurrent physical or psychological problems likely to have been caused or exacerbated by prescription drugs.
  • Physical or psychological issues that are likely to have been caused or exacerbated by prescription medication use.
  • High tolerance for prescription medication.
  • Withdrawal symptoms experienced without using prescription medications.

Prescription Medication Treatment at Flatirons Recovery

Those wishing to engage in treatment for any kind of prescription medication use disorder at Flatirons Recovery will typically engage in a medical detoxification program for a clinically determined period of 2-7 days to ensure that a client is medically stable. This is especially crucial for those who have been using or abusing benzodiazepines for a long period of time, as detoxification from benzodiazepines can have serious medical complications–including death–that require close monitoring by medical professionals.

Post-detox, treatment for a Substance Use Disorder stemming from prescription medications at Flatirons Recovery typically begins in our PHP/Day Treatment program for a period of at least 4 weeks, the details of which can be found here.

From there, clients often step-down into our IOP for a period of 4-12 weeks, while continuing to work with their therapeutic team on a plan to address support needs that will be crucial to maintaining recovery after structured treatment ends.

Treatment for Addiction

If you or a loved one’s prescription drug use meet at least two of these criteria in the past 12 months, then you may be suffering from a substance use disorder requiring treatment.

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